Chronicles of Extreme Future Part 3: The ID Card

April 18 2008 / by Fictionthis / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Technology   Year: Beyond   Rating: 4 Hot

Cross-posted from the blog of new fiction-focused startup fictionthis.com.

National ID cards were introduced in 2011.

At first they were simply embedded in passports, containing personal ID data. Second Generation ID Data chips were designed to have uploading capabilities and contained even more data, including criminal and medical records. Third generation ID Chips had an option to be inserted under your skin and gave access into your ID data base in any government institution, which made forgetting or losing your license or social security details a thing of the past.

For military personnel it was compulsory to have it inserted. Unauthorized access to military installations was simply non-existent from that moment on. Generation Four chip nicknamed “Quattro Access” became an instant hit with the younger generation. It allowed access to personal finance as well as personal storage space to share music, files and photos. (cont.)

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Voice-enabled ID chips will soon make our lives more efficient

September 03 2008 / by futuretalk / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Other   Year: General   Rating: 1

By Dick Pelletier

You enter the supermarket, grab an electronic cart that recognizes you from your touch, toss in some bags and begin shopping. The monitor on your ‘smart cart’ displays products, price, and total amount spent; and even subtracts items returned to the shelf.

As you wind through the aisles, the cart’s voice recognizes products you’re running low on, and offers special discounts just for you. When finished shopping, simply tap a ‘chipped’ finger indicating payment preference and walk out the door – no more lines or grocery clerks to deal with. On exit, select an option to deactivate or encrypt all chips, which protects your privacy by preventing evildoers from tracking you or your merchandise.

After putting items away at home, the milk might say, “I expire in nine days, would you like a 24-hour reminder”, or the hat you purchased may say, “Hey Dick, why not wear me now, you know how great I make you look”.

By 2012, experts believe the above scenarios could be happening at stores everywhere.

Milwaukee futurist David Zach agrees that voice-enabled chips will increase efficiency. Clothes could remark, “Don’t wash me with colors”; cars may cry out, “I need oil”, and a glass might tell the bartender, “he’s had enough”.

Wearable computer maker Vocollect believes their voice-enabled machines can team up with RFID (Radio Frequency ID) chips used to identify items, and create an enormous array of exciting applications.

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