A Trillion Reasons to Care About Genomics

July 02 2008 / by juldrich / In association with Future Blogger.net
Category: Biotechnology   Year: General   Rating: 11 Hot

By Jack Uldrich

Cross-posted from www.jumpthecurve.net

I speak to a great many student groups and I am often struck by how few of them appreciate the difference between one million, one billion and one trillion. (In the name of fairness, the same is true of many adults). Perhaps, it is because the three figures are all large numbers that most people don’t think there is an appreciable difference. Perhaps, it is because the words – million, billion, and trillion – the rhyme; or maybe it’s just because they’re dumb—or have had poor teachers. I really don’t know.

One way I have tried to convey the difference between the numbers is by explaining the figures in a different way. To wit:

One million seconds was 12 days ago; One billion seconds was roughly 30 years ago; One trillion seconds was approximately 30,000 years ago – 28,000 B.C.!

My point with the analogy is that one trillion of anything is a really BIG number, and it is much, much different than one billion. This analogy is important because on January 17, 2006 the Wellcome Sanger Institute announced it had archived it’s one billionth DNA sequence. It was an impressive accomplishment.

Well, today, Wired magazine reported that the prominent genetics institute sequenced its trillionth base of DNA. This is a one thousand-fold improvement in just over two years. (cont.)

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Augmented Reality - Closer Than You Might Think

February 09 2009 / by Jeff Hilford
Category: Technology   Year: 2009   Rating: 9 Hot

Here are two cool examples of augmented reality apps/prototypes that are already out.  The first is a really fun one from GE's futuristic Ecoimagination campaign.  By making a print-out from their site and holding it in front of your monitor it brings the animation out of the box and into your room.  Here's the Future is Awesome's Duncan Rawlinson demonstrating it with the print out attached to his mobile.

 

Here are some other DIY examples that illustrate it further  123.

Another very cool, though early incarnation technology that gives us a hint of how we'll be interacting with information in our physical environments comes to us from the MIT Media Lab - demoed at the recent TED conference (via Wired).

It's "a wearable computer system that turns any surface into an interactive display screen."  Definitely has some of that early stage Minority Report feel to it and I think when looking at these two examples it's pretty obvious that this world will be here sooner than most people think.